latimespast
latimespast:

"The greatest continuing news story in the history of man has begun," The Times declared on June 6, 1944, better known as D-day. The declaration came not in the text of the story on the front page, but in the box you see at the bottom. It promised "the detailed story of the invasion, complete with all the available maps and pictures," delivered with "speed, thoroughness and accuracy."
You can see how some of that coverage played out in the days that followed here, and here are photos of people reading the front page you see above.
- Laura E. Davis

latimespast:

"The greatest continuing news story in the history of man has begun," The Times declared on June 6, 1944, better known as D-day. The declaration came not in the text of the story on the front page, but in the box you see at the bottom. It promised "the detailed story of the invasion, complete with all the available maps and pictures," delivered with "speed, thoroughness and accuracy."

You can see how some of that coverage played out in the days that followed here, and here are photos of people reading the front page you see above.

- Laura E. Davis